Website Developer

A website developer designs and creates websites. They maintain all..

Website Developer

What does a Website Developer do?

Median Pay $66,130
Growth Rate 27%
Citation Retrieved in 2017 from BLS.org

A website developer designs and creates websites. They maintain all of the website’s technical aspects, track the site’s traffic, and the site’s page load speed. They also create web content for their clients targeted goals and audiences and conduct tests to determine what website design or development works best.

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How to Become a Website Developer

website developer

To become a website developer an associate’s degree in web design or a similar field is helpful. However, gaining a bachelor’s degree is advisable and becoming more common. A website developer should be educated in graphic design as well as programming. Having experience in computer systems or service related industry and being in-tune to the latest technology is very helpful due to the competitive nature of this career field. These skills or degrees can be earned at a community college, state college, or university.

Web developers need to have an understanding of HTML programming languages such as Java script or SQL in addition to multimedia software such as Flash. They also need to be detailed oriented and creative in addition to have the ability to build relationships with their clients.

Job Description of a Website Developer

A website developer designs visually appealing websites. Their goal is to get a clients website rapidly seen or promoted online. A developer is also skilled in writing custom scripts for their clients using various scripting languages.

A website developer would likely create the entire website, therefore they would design the functional components, all the pages, and the site layout. A skilled developer designs their client’s website with consideration to a specific market and creates innovative way to showcase their customer’s services or products. The web developer assists their clients by suggesting ideas that may provide advantages over competitors websites. A web developer designs websites to be easily assessable and functional by checking forms and pages and using the top browser’s to check for interoperability. They create websites that you can navigate smoothly while maintaining a professional and attractive look for the consumers or web users.

Job prospects for this industry are good considering the increase of technology use worldwide. Web developers usually work full time and the majority work in computer systems designs or related industries that specialize both development and design.

Web Developer Career Video Transcript

Web developers have the unusual ability to think creatively while working with very structured information. If you enjoy exploring websites and want to work with both design and technical skills, web development may be the career for you. Web developers design the look and function of a website. They may develop content and work with customers or company leaders to define a website’s purpose, audience, and the needs it should meet. They often work in teams to determine how to organize and lay out the website. Developers use programming languages to build the website and integrate graphics, audio, and video. Some developers handle all aspects of a website’s construction, while others specialize in a certain aspect of it. Specialized web developers include web architects, who create the basic framework of the site and ensure that it provides users with the intended experience; web designers, who create the site’s layout and integrate graphics, applications; and webmasters, who ensure that websites function correctly and keep them updated. Most web developers enter the field with an associate’s degree in web design or a related field, but skills in programming languages may be more important to employers than education credentials. Throughout their career, web developers must keep up to date on new tools and computer languages. A significant percentage of web developers are self-employed. Produced by CareerOneStop. CareerOneStop is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.


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